Collections > Southern Oral History Program Interviews > Interviews > SOHP Series U. The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s > U.013. The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Oral History and the Modern South

U.013. The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: Oral History and the Modern South

This series contains a group of 43 interviews conducted by students under the direction of Jacquelyn Dowd Hall during the Spring 2008 semester at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Topics bear on the history of the American South and are related to themes emphasized by the Southern Oral History Program. These themes include, among many others, women’s leadership from the 1920s to the present, second wave feminism, labor and working class history, the history of UNC, journalism, the legal profession, environmental issues, and southern politics. These class materials are related to the SOHP’s “The Long Civil Rights Movement” initiative. This project aims to expand the understanding of the civil rights movement far beyond the dramatic decade of mass protests against segregation, stressing the struggle that began in the 1930s and spawned a series of other social movements from the 1960s onward. Students chose a broad range of topics related to “The Long Civil Rights Movement.” These topics include, but are not limited to, post-secondary school desegregation; politics and race relations in Durham, N.C., and Winston-Salem, N.C.; the medical profession and race; the sit-in movement in North Carolina; the Gay, Lesbian and Transgender community in North Carolina; race and gender in athletics; and Spanish-language media. Also included in this series are 25 interviews by Rob Lalka with individuals active in the Orleans Parish Public Schools reform effort.

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