Collections > Southern Oral History Program Interviews > Interviews > SOHP Series U. The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s > U.002. The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: School Desegregation in Robeson County, N.C.

U.002. The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s: School Desegregation in Robeson County, N.C.

Under the leadership of Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, the Southern Oral History Program launched a major new initiative, "The Long Civil Rights Movement: The South Since the 1960s." This project collects interviews with men and women who in the years following the sit-ins and protests of the 1960s fought to keep the doors of equal opportunity open and to extend the civil rights struggle into new arenas. Interviews focus on the process and challenges of tri-racial school desegregation in Robeson County, N.C. Interviewees discuss the internal political dynamics of the Lumbee and Tuscarora Indians of Robeson County, and race relations between black and white, white and Indian, and black and Indian communities. Although these interviews focus on school desegregation, they also cover multiple facets of the civil rights movement in Robeson County between 1954 and 1988. The mechanics of segregation and desegregation, interviewees' experiences in a tri-racial community, and present-day attitudes are discussed.

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