K.002.001. Southern Communities: Listening for a Change: Overview Project

Listening for a Change encompasses a series of interviews exploring the dramatic changes in North Carolina since World War II, and a variety of thematic, community-based projects centered primarily on the themes of race and the public schools, the environment, and the impact of a changing global economy and new immigrants. The project's name was inspired by the book, Listening for a Change: Oral History and Community Development, co-authored by Hugo Slim and Paul Thompson, which emphasizes the importance of oral history as a form of participatory documentation, a method of historical inquiry that encourages the active involvement of community members. The overview project is the most wide-ranging component of Listening for a Change. Most interviews are by historian David Cecelski, who traveled around North Carolina seeking individuals who could help explain the epochal changes taking place in the state. Cecelski has described this work as a collage--an attempt to convey a strong sense of the diversity and richness of the state's past. Cecelski's column, "Listening to History," in the Raleigh News and Observer is based on interviews for this project. Additional interviews have been conducted by Melynn Glusman. The overview project is the most wide-ranging component of Listening for a Change. Most are by historian David Cecelski, who traveled around North Carolina seeking individuals who could help explain the epochal changes taking place in the state. Cecelski has described this work as a "collage"--an attempt to convey a strong sense of the diversity and richness of the state's past. Cecelski's column, "Listening to History," in the Raleigh News and Observer is based on interviews for this project. Additional interviews have been conducted by Melynn Glusman.

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